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Triple Canopy is pleased to announce Speculations (“The future is ______”), fifty days of lectures, discussions, and debates about the future, as part of EXPO 1: New York at MoMA PS1. Speculations will take place from May 12 to July 28, in a structure created by artist José León Cerrillo and in an installation designed by artist Adrián Villar Rojas. Participants include Marina Abramović, Jacob Appelbaum, David Auerbach, Gopal Balakrishnan, Klaus Biesenbach, Ray Brassier, Ted Chiang, Jace Clayton, Adam Cohen, CAConrad, John Crowley, Chris Csikszentmihalyi, Mary “Missy” Cummings, Samuel Delany, Sergio De La Pava, Agnes Denes, Silvia Federici, Peter Frase, Rivka Galchen, Alex Gourevitch, David Graeber, Group Theory, N. Katherine Hayles, Natalie Jeremijenko, Thomas Keenan, Katie Kitamura, Josh Kline, Benjamin Kunkel, Ajay Kurian, Rachel Kushner, Lynn Hershman Leeson, Kelly Link, Marie Lorenz, Niklas Maak, Danny Marcus, Mary Mattingly, Joseph McElroy, Maureen McHugh, Yates McKee, Mileece, John Miller, Naeem Mohaiemen, Evgeny Morozov, Heidi Neilson, Ted Nelson, Hương Ngô, Trevor Paglen, Ashwin Parameswaran, Laura Poitras, Fatima Al Qadiri, Srikanth Reddy, David Rieff, Ben Rivers, Kim Stanley Robinson, Carne Ross, Norman Rush, Saskia Sassen, Taryn Simon, Elizabeth Stark, Astra Taylor, Mierle Laderman Ukeles, Kathi Weeks, and Ben Wizner. The full schedule is posted below.

We know all the ways the world will end. And yet, we continue. Our action in the present implies an optimism about the future, even if that optimism is skeptical, worried, or dark. For Speculations (“The future is ______”), Triple Canopy is inviting writers, artists, scientists, activists, economists, and technologists to bet on futures they want to see realized and to describe them as clearly as possible, while considering what demands these futures make on the present. The speculations will take the form of daily lectures and debates in Villar Rojas’s installation and discussions within the structure created by Cerrillo, which will also house a library and an offline file-sharing network for collective speculations, designed by artist and programmer Dan Phiffer.

All Speculations participants will be filling out a standard questionnaire about their future and its demands on the present, for eventual publication. The public is also invited to speculate on the future and reconsider the present by answering the questionnaire, which will be available all summer at MoMA PS1. Please email speculations@canopycanopycanopy.com with any questions.


Format
Mondays, Thursdays (except July 4), and Fridays
One speaker will give a two-part presentation, each part an hour long. The first part, a seminar, taking place at 2 p.m., will be a discussion of a historical speculation on the future—a short text or other work that the speaker has found generative. The second part, a talk or lecture, taking place at 4 p.m., will present the speaker’s own speculation on the future, to be followed by a Q&A. Weekday events are unticketed and free with museum admission.

Saturdays (through June 22), Sundays, and Thursday, July 4
Weekend days and July Fourth will have a wider range of formats: debate, conversation, keynote, performance, etc. Generally, sessions will begin at 3 p.m. (times will vary) and last for up to two hours. For capacity reasons, these events are ticketed; tickets include museum admission. Tickets are available here.

Weekday lectures and weekend debates, conversations, keynotes, and so on can be watched live or as archived videos via Livestream.


Sunday, May 12, 12–6 p.m.
Opening of EXPO 1: New York and Speculations (“The future is ________”). The School will be open all day, with talks by Triple Canopy editors and others.

Monday, May 13, 2 p.m seminar & 4 p.m. lecture
Rachel Kushner is author of the novels The Flamethrowers and Telex from Cuba (a finalist for the National Book Award and the Dayton Literary Peace Prize) and is a 2013 Guggenheim Fellow. She will describe a future in which the American prison system has been dissolved. View the Livestream.

Thursday, May 16, 2 p.m seminar & 4 p.m. lecture
Dan Phiffer is a programmer and artist interested in hackable, inexpensive computer networks. He will lead a workshop on his projects Occupy.here and the Speculations Library, and sketch a future in which everyone controls their own data. View the Livestream.

Friday, May 17, 2 p.m seminar & 4 p.m. lecture
Saskia Sassen is a sociologist whose work focuses on globalization, urban studies, and emerging technologies. Her most recent book is Territory, Authority, Rights. At 2:00 p.m., she will discuss “Imminent Domain,” her short article on the global protests of 2011—Occupy Wall Street, los indignados, Tahrir Square—and occupation as a political strategy. At 4:00 p.m., she will speculate about migration and the future of the global city. View the Livestream.

Saturday, May 18, 3 p.m.
Known for his monumental clay sculptures, Adrián Villar Rojas represented Argentina at the 2011 Venice Biennale. Klaus Biesenbach is director of MoMA PS1 and chief curator at large at the Museum of Modern Art. They will discuss “Dark Optimism” and Villar Rojas’s installation La inocencia de los animales, built for the EXPO School. View the Livestream.

Sunday, May 19, 3 p.m.
Samuel Delany is the author of science-fiction novels including Dhalgren and Babel-17. Kelly Link coedits Small Beer Press and has written three collections of fantastic short stories, most recently Pretty Monsters. They will talk about how we use and abuse the future. View the Livestream.

Monday, May 20, 2 p.m seminar & 4 p.m. lecture
Maureen McHugh’s latest story collection, After the Apocalypse, was one of Publishers Weekly’s Ten Best Books of 2011. She will speculate on the consequences of depopulation and de-extinction, and the possibility of terraforming Earth itself to ensure our survival. View the Livestream.

Thursday, May 23, 2 p.m seminar & 4 p.m. lecture
John Miller is an artist and writer based in New York and Berlin, and a professor of professional practice at Barnard. At 2:00 p.m. he will discuss Vilem Flusser’s Toward a Philosophy of Photography and describe the impact of cybernetic information technologies on future social structure. At 4:00 p.m. he will speculate about environmental concerns as they relate to entropy, technology, systems theory, networks, conceptual art, sci-fi, and immortality. View the Livestream.

Friday, May 24, 2 p.m seminar & 4 p.m. lecture
Adam Cohen is a professor in the Departments of Chemistry and Chemical Biology and Physics at Harvard. His research focuses on controlling light-matter interactions in warm, wet, squishy environments. At 2:00 p.m. he will discuss writings by Francis Crick and H. G. Wells on DNA and the mutability of life-forms. At 4:00 p.m. he will speculate about the future of stem cells and the brain. View the Livestream.

Saturday, May 25, 3 p.m.
Journalist David Rieff, author of books on immigration, international conflict, and humanitarianism, will detail the proposed solutions to the world food crisis, and the serious difficulties with each. View the Livestream.

Sunday, May 26, 3 p.m.
Rivka Galchen’s first novel, Atmospheric Disturbances, was awarded the William Saroyan International Prize for Writing. Norman Rush is the author of three novels, including Mating, which won the National Book Award for Fiction in 1991. They will discuss commonalities between literature, OCD, fortunetelling, lucid dreaming, and weather reports. View the Livestream.

Monday, May 27, 2 p.m seminar & 4 p.m. lecture
Marie Lorenz is an artist whose project The Tide and Current Taxi ferries passengers through the waterways of New York. At 2 p.m. she will discuss the alien “Zone” in the Russian sci-fi film Stalker and novel Roadside Picnic. At 4 p.m. she will describe how to experience the future in the trash of the present. View the Livestream.

Thursday, May 30, 2 p.m seminar & 4 p.m. lecture
In 2009, Mary Mattingly launched the Waterpod project, a sustainable art-and-technology habitat. At 2 p.m. she will discuss “Critical Path: Part Four” from Buckminster Fuller's Critical Path. At 4 p.m. she will talk about a future where people rely on community-based networks for resource sharing, from islands made of boats and barges to flock houses to floating spheres. View the Livestream.

Friday, May 31, 4 p.m. lecture. **Nb. There is no 2 p.m. session for this event. The session with Ellen Ullman is canceled.
Hương Ngô is an educator and artist whose performance-based collaborations have been supported by the New Museum, Rhizome, LMCC, the Kitchen, and Tate Modern. She will present recent research on Mars-colonization simulations as they relate to contemporary performance practices. Heidi Neilson is an artist addressing topics such as weather, fake snow, and debris in the Earth’s orbit. She will present recent research on space debris, the “landscape” of space, and off-Earth parks. View the Livestream.

Saturday, June 1, 3 p.m.
Chris Csikszentmihalyi is an artist working on technologies that rebalance power between citizens, governments, and corporations, and founded and directed the Center for Civic Media at MIT. Mary “Missy” Cummings is one of the Navy’s first female fighter pilots and director of the MIT Humans and Automation Lab. Thomas Keenan is director of the Bard Human Rights Project. They will debate the future of drones. View the Livestream.

Sunday, June 2, 3 p.m.
Taryn Simon draws on many disciplines to explore the limits and possibilities of photographic representation. Her first solo exhibition took place at MoMA PS1 in 2003. With Tim Griffin, Executive Director and Chief Curator of The Kitchen, Simon will discuss her recent projects Picture Collection and Image Atlas (with Aaron Swartz), and how they envision the history and future of the image archive. View the Livestream.

Monday, June 3, 2 p.m seminar & 4 p.m. lecture
Mileece is a sonic artist whose interactive “ecoscapes” are generated from the electromagnetic emissions of plants and by handmade, sensor-based musical instruments. At 2 p.m. she will discuss biocurrents and demonstrate the construction of simple bioelectrodes. At 4 p.m. she will describe the design of utopian environments along with the future of renewable energy and distributed power generation. View the Livestream.

Thursday, June 6, 2 p.m seminar & 4 p.m. lecture
Naeem Mohaiemen is a writer and visual artist working in Dhaka and New York who explores the history of the international left and utopia. At 2 p.m. he will discuss the 1970s ultra-left and show excerpts from his film United Red Army (The Young Man Was, Part 1). At 4 p.m. he will speculate on the future of leftism as an alternative to piety politics in Muslim-majority countries. View the Livestream.

Friday, June 7, 2 p.m seminar & 4 p.m. lecture
Katie Kitamura has written for Frieze, Wired, and the New York Times. Her novels include The Longshot and Gone to the Forest. At 2 p.m. she will draw on Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s film World on a Wire to consider simulacra as a model for thinking about fiction writing and authorship. At 4 p.m. she will describe a future where languages are traded like currency. View the Livestream.

Saturday, June 8, 3 p.m.
Group Theory, a Brooklyn-based theater company, is Ben Vershbow and Dorit Avganim plus collaborators. They will present scenes from their work-in-progress Coast of Mars, a Russian doll of stories, conversations, and fantastic reveals, pondering our near future (and recent past) on the Red Planet. With: Clare Barron, Max Dana, Craig Pattison and Ted Schneider. View the Livestream.

Sunday, June 9, 1:30 p.m. lecture & 4 p.m. conversation
Kim Stanley Robinson is a science-fiction author and the winner of Hugo, Nebula, and Locus Awards. At 1:30 p.m., he will deliver a keynote talk, “What Is the Future For?,” and consider the strange shape that climate change gives the future. View the Livestream. At 4 p.m., he will be in conversation with novelist John Crowley. View the Livestream.

Monday, June 10, 2 p.m seminar & 4 p.m. lecture
John Crowley is the author of many novels and volumes of short fiction, including the famed fantasy novel Little, Big. He will discuss the prophetic work of Norman Bel Geddes, designer of the Futurama, and describe his own foolproof method of predicting the far-distant world future. View the Livestream.

Thursday, June 13, 2 p.m seminar & 4 p.m. lecture
Benjamin Kunkel is an editor of n+1 and author of the novel Indecision. At 2 p.m. he will discuss the final chapter of Lewis Mumford's Technics and Civilization. At 4 p.m. he will talk about the idea of “commonism,” or some institutions for an ecological and egalitarian society. View the Livestream.

Friday, June 14, 2 p.m seminar & 4 p.m. lecture
Joseph McElroy is the author of nine novels, including Women and Men and Cannonball, as well as a nonfiction book about water, long in progress and to be completed later this year. At 2 p.m. he will be discussing Stanley Crawford's Mayordomo: Chronicle of an Acequia in Northern New Mexico. At 4 p.m. he will outline the elements of a new global ethos of water. View the Livestream.

Saturday, June 15, 3 p.m.
Niklas Maak, German writer, architecture critic, and co-organizer of the EXPO Colony, will give a short lecture, “Reclaiming Public Space: The EXPO Colony and Small-Scale Utopias,” on the contemporary crisis of domestic architecture, offering a counterhistory of communes and collectivity in twentieth- and twenty-first-century architecture. He will be joined by Colony architects a77, arts collective Not an Alternative, and MoMA PS1 associate curator Jenny Schlenzka to discuss new ideas about housing, privacy, and public space. View the Livestream.

Sunday, June 16, 3 p.m.
Peter Frase is an editor of Jacobin and a Ph.D. candidate in sociology at the CUNY Graduate Center. Ashwin Parameswaran writes about resilience in economics, ecology, technology, and other complex systems. They will debate the future of work, technological unemployment, and the universal basic income. View the Livestream.

Monday, June 17, 2 p.m seminar & 4 p.m. lecture
Yates McKee is an art critic and organizer with various Occupy projects including Strike Debt. His work has appeared in venues including October, Grey Room, the Nation, and Waging Nonviolence. He is coeditor of the book Sensible Politics: The Visual Cultures of Nongovernmental Activism, as well as the magazine Tidal: Occupy Theory, Occupy Strategy. At 2 p.m. he will discuss three short readings: “Communiqué from an Absent Future,” dispatched from the student occupation at the University of California in 2009; Martha Rosler's “The Artistic Mode of Revolution: From Gentrification to Occupation”; and “Questions for John Holloway,” from  Tidal: Occupy Theory, Occupy Strategy. At 4 p.m. he will give a lecture, “Aliens from the Future,” in which he will speculate about the future of radical education with reference to Occupy Wall Street, Free Cooper Union, the Far Rockaways, and the east side of Detroit. View the Livestream.

Thursday, June 20, 2 p.m seminar & 4 p.m. lecture
N. Katherine Hayles is professor of literature at Duke and author of How We Became Posthuman. At 2 p.m. she will discuss Speculation, an alternate-reality game in which a collapsed euro has plunged the world into economic crisis. At 4 p.m. she will lecture on algorithmic trading and the urgent need for humanists, artists, and game developers to develop counternarratives displacing the dominant discussion around global financial markets. View the Livestream.

Friday, June 21, 2 p.m seminar & 4 p.m. lecture
Carne Ross is a former British diplomat and founder of the nonprofit advisory group Independent Diplomat. He is also the author of The Leaderless Revolution. At 2 p.m. he will discuss Ludwig Wittgenstein's Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus. At 4 p.m. he will describe a future in which political power is redistributed from governments to individuals. View the Livestream.

Saturday, June 22, 3 p.m.
Artists Alisa Baremboym, Ian Cheng, Josh Kline and Ajay Kurian, whose work is included in EXPO 1: New York in the group exhibition "ProBio," will discuss the future of the body, the future of art, the artist as speculative thinker, and posthumanism in contemporary art. Kline, who organized "ProBio" will introduce the conversation and speak briefly about the exhibition. View the Livestream.

Sunday, June 23, 3 p.m.
Alex Gourevitch is a political-science professor at Brown University who writes on the environment, work, and economic freedom. Kathi Weeks is author`of The Problem with Work: Feminism, Marxism, Antiwork Politics, and Postwork Imaginaries. They will debate the role of work in a better future. View the Livestream.

Monday, June 24, 2 p.m seminar & 4 p.m. lecture
Srikanth Reddy is the author of two books of poetry, Facts for Visitors and Voyager, which probes this world’s cosmological relation to the plurality of all possible worlds. At 2 p.m. he will discuss H. G. Wells's The Time Machine and futurity in Victorian fiction. At 4 p.m. he will talk about a future in which the living outnumber the dead. View the Livestream.

Thursday, June 27, 2 p.m seminar & 4 p.m. lecture
Jace Clayton is an artist focused on the intersection of sound, technology use in low-income communities, and public space. As DJ /rupture, Clayton has released a number of acclaimed albums. At 2 p.m. he will talk about Ted Chiang's "Story of Your Life." At 4 p.m. he will discuss inexpensive time-travel devices and how the future might not exist. View the Livestream.

Friday, June 28, 2 p.m seminar & 4 p.m. lecture
Ben Rivers is an experimental filmmaker and artist based in London. Drawing on his film in development, After London, he will talk about a possible future England, landscape transformation, toxic wastelands, and the coexistence of multiple, diverging utopias. View the Livestream.

Sunday, June 30, 1 p.m.
Thomas Drake is a former senior executive of the National Security Agency (NSA) and whistleblower indicted under the Espionage Act. The charges were eventually dropped. Trevor Paglen is an artist and the author of books on experimental geography and state secrecy. Jesselyn Radack is national security & human rights director for the Government Accountability Project. She works primarily with national security and intelligence community whistleblowers, and represented Drake in the government's unsuccessful prosecution. They will discuss government surveillance and how ordinary citizens can reclaim their anonymity. Note 1 p.m. start time. View the Livestream.

Monday, July 1, 2 p.m seminar & 4 p.m. lecture
The poet CAConrad is the son of white-trash asphyxiation whose childhood included selling cut flowers along the highway for his mother and helping her shoplift. He is the author of A BEAUTIFUL MARSUPIAL AFTERNOON: New (Soma)tics, The Book of Frank, Advanced Elvis Course, Deviant Propulsion, and a collaboration with poet Frank Sherlock titled The City Real & Imagined. At 2 p.m. he will talk about (soma)tic poetry practice and the future poetics of the extreme present. At 4 p.m. he will describe how the ever-increasing brutality of our mechanistic world has required us to find our bodies to find our planet in order to find our poetry. View the Livestream.

Thursday, July 4, 3 p.m.
Gopal Balakrishnan is a political theorist and author of The Enemy (on Carl Schmitt) and “Speculations on the Stationary State.” David Graeber is an anthropologist and activist whose books include The Democracy Project and Debt. They will discuss prospects for utopia and stagnation, in America and worldwide.

Friday, July 5, 2 p.m seminar & 4 p.m. lecture
Ted Nelson is an American philosopher and pioneer theorist of information technology, best known for coining the terms “hypertext” and “hypermedia.” His Project Xanadu, founded in 1960, anticipated the World Wide Web. At 2 p.m. he will discuss T. L. Sherred's sci-fi story "E for Effort," which foresaw Wikileaks and Bradley Manning in 1947. At 4 p.m. he will talk about the inevitable population collapse and offer a slim hope for civilization's survival. View the Livestream.

Sunday, July 7, 1 p.m.
Esther Dyson is chairman of EDventure Holdings and founder of HICCup.co, for Health Intervention Coordinating Council. HICCup is an open-source initiative devoted to defining and testing a business model for investing in health (not health care) that will return profits to investors and health to the participants. From October 2008 to March 2009, she lived in Star City outside Moscow, training as a backup cosmonaut. She will deliver a talk entitled “Data, Predictions, and Luck: The Implications of Knowing Almost Everything.” View the Livestream.

Sunday, July 7, 3 p.m.
Elizabeth Stark has taught at Stanford and Yale about the future of the internet and is currently an Entrepreneur-in-Residence at Stanford's StartX. Astra Taylor is a documentarian, Strike Debt activist, and author of The People’s Platform: And Other Digital Delusions. They will debate technological and anti-institutional approaches to the future of education. View the Livestream.

Monday, July 8, 2 p.m seminar & 4 p.m. lecture
Ted Chiang is the author of Stories of Your Life and Others and, most recently, the novella The Lifecycle of Software Objects. His fiction has won the Hugo, Nebula, Sturgeon, and Locus Awards. At 2 p.m. he will discuss the short story "The Guy Who Worked for Money" by Benjamin Rosenbaum. At 4 p.m. he will describe how technology will change the way we narrativize our lives. View the Livestream.

Thursday, July 11, 2 p.m. seminar & 4 p.m. lecture
Fatima Al Qadiri is a New York–based Kuwaiti composer and visual artist, and a contributing editor at DIS. At 2 p.m. she will discuss the 1988 Japanese cyberpunk film Akira, visual and musical specters of the apocalypse, Japanese literature and religion, and her experience of the first Gulf War. At 4 p.m. she will present a soundtrack for a future apocalypse in the form of a live DJ set.

Friday, July 12, 2 p.m. seminar & 4 p.m. lecture
Joshua Cohen was born in New Jersey in 1980. He is the author of seven books, most recently Attention! A (Short) History. At 2 p.m. he will speak about how we develop a concept of “the future,” and discuss a short excerpt from Attention! At 4 p.m. he will discuss the future of attention. View the Livestream.

Sunday, July 14, 1 p.m.
Marina Abramović has been using her own body as subject, object, and medium since the early 1970s. In 2011, the Museum of Modern Art presented her retrospective “The Artist Is Present.” She will talk about how to create a productive union between the arts, science, technology, spirituality, and education in the future. View the Livestream.

Monday, July 15, 2 p.m seminar & 4 p.m. lecture
Danny Marcus is a Ph.D. candidate in Art History at the University of California, Berkeley, whose writings on Occupy have appeared in October and the n+1 Occupy! Gazette. At 2 p.m. he will discuss Leon de Mattis's essay "What is communisation?" At 4 p.m. he will describe what a communist future would look like, and how to get there. View the Livestream.

Thursday, July 18, 2 p.m seminar & 4 p.m. lecture
Silvia Federici, emerita professor of political philosophy and international studies at Hofstra University, is an activist, teacher, and writer whose most recent book is Revolution at Point Zero. At 2 p.m. she will discuss her article “Feminism and the Politics of the Commons.” At 4 p.m. she will talk about the future of the family and reproductive labor. View the Livestream.

Friday, July 19, 2 p.m seminar & 4 p.m. lecture
Ray Brassier is a philosopher and a translator of Alain Badiou and Quentin Meillassoux. A participant in the original “Speculative Realism” conference, he is author of Nihil Unbound: Enlightenment and Extinction. At 2 p.m. he will discuss J. G. Ballard's "The Voices of Time." At 4 p.m. he will discuss what the future is and what it means to orient oneself toward it. View the Livestream.

Sunday, July 21, 1 & 3:30 p.m.
At 1 p.m., artist-engineer Natalie Jeremijenko will discuss art and science's responses to climate change. View the Livestream.

At 3:30 p.m. the pioneer in ecological and land art Agnes Denes will give a lecture, “Art for the Third Millennium,” on her ongoing project designing mega-dunes and barrier islands to protect the Rockaway shores and New York Harbor from future storms. She will also discuss future cities she designed in 1980 to deal with global warming. Denes's monumental earthworks have included forests in Finland and Australia. Documentation of her Wheatfield—A Confrontation, two acres of wheat she grew and harvested in a Battery Park City landfill in 1982, is on view at EXPO 1: New York. View the Livestream.

Monday, July 22, 2 p.m seminar & 4 p.m. lecture
Lynn Hershman Leeson is an artist and filmmaker who uses pioneering technologies to investigate the real and the virtual. She will describe a near future where genetic manipulation and the interfacing of humans and machines render remarkable possibilities for human evolution. View the Livestream.

Thursday, July 25, 2 p.m seminar & 4 p.m. lecture
Mierle Laderman Ukeles is an artist known for her exploration of feminist, labor, and ecological themes. Since 1977, she has created art that deals with the endless maintenance and service work that “keeps the city alive,” urban waste flows, recycling, ecology, urban sustainability and our power to transform degraded land and water into healthy public places. At 2 p.m. she will discuss “Why Sanitation Can Be Used as a Model for Public Art” (1984) and “The Power of the Artist and the Power of Art in the Public Domain” (2007), to be followed by a brief conversation with Ron Gonen, deputy commissioner of sanitation, recycling, and sustainability.. At 4 p.m. Ukeles will present, for the first time, the future of her work as the DSNY Percent for Art Artist at Freshkills Park. View the Livestream.

Friday, July 26, 2 p.m seminar & 4 p.m. lecture
Sergio De La Pava is a public defender in New York City and author of the novels A Naked Singularity and Personae. At 2 p.m. he will discuss Philip K. Dick's story "The Minority Report." At 4 p.m. he will speak about the future of criminal justice. View the Livestream.

Sunday, July 28, 3 p.m.
David Auerbach is a writer and software engineer. Evgeny Morozov is author of The Net Delusion and To Save Everything, Click Here. Ben Wizner is director of the ACLU’s Speech, Privacy, and Technology Project. They will debate technology’s false utopias and progressive possibilities. Tickets are available for this session.


About EXPO 1: New York
EXPO 1: New York is a large-scale exploration of ecological challenges in the context of the economic and sociopolitical instability of the early twenty-first century. Acting in the guise of a festival-as-institution, EXPO 1: New York reconsiders the museum from the ground up, presenting a simultaneity of modules, interventions, solo projects, and group exhibitions that encompass all of MoMA PS1 and other locations such as MoMA and Rockaway Beach. EXPO 1: New York is made possible by a partnership with Volkswagen.

Participants