News

Announcing our Publication Intensive in New York & Providence, June 11–22, 2018

What:A two-week program in the history and contemporary practice of publication.

Where:The program will take place for one week at Triple Canopy’s venue in Manhattan and for one week at the RISD Museum in Providence, Rhode Island; it will include visits to studios of artists and designers, archives, and cultural institutions.

Who:We invite applications from recent college graduates, graduate students, and those with comparable experience; we discourage applications from those with much more experience. Prospective participants might have backgrounds in areas such as writing, art, literature, art history, technology, and design.

Cost:Tuition is free, though participants must arrange and pay for their travel and accommodation. All reading and viewing materials will be provided free of cost.

Apply:Online through 11:59pm on Sunday, April 29.

During the Publication Intensive, Triple Canopy editors and invited artists, writers, scholars, designers, publishers, and technologists will lead discussions and workshops. Participants will research, analyze, and enact an approach to publication that hinges on today’s networked forms of production and circulation but also mines the history of print culture and artistic practice.

The Publication Intensive will address such questions as: How have artists, writers, and designers used the pages of magazines and books as sites of and material for experimentation? How have new-media publications challenged conventions of authorship and reception, only to have those very challenges soon become the foundation of the new economy? How have people responded to ensuing changes in the media landscape? And how have responses differed in areas with disparate resources and relationships to technology? What are the politics of access and identity associated with online public forums and media?

In the second week of the Publication Intensive, participants will work with Triple Canopy editors on the development of an upcoming issue that will act as the magazine’s contribution to an exhibition at the RISD Museum in 2019, “Raid the Icebox Now.” (“Raid the Icebox Now” marks the fiftieth anniversary “Raid the Icebox I with Andy Warhol,” a landmark of artist-curated museum exhibitions.) Triple Canopy has been invited to engage with Pendleton House, which was created to display the 1904 bequest of Charles L. Pendleton (1846–1904), who has been called the “father of art as applied to furniture”; his superlative collection was meant to demonstrate to the public the merit of American design. Pendleton’s furniture is now on view alongside selections from the museum’s collection, which range from portraits of colonial aristocracy to Chinese ceramics. Pendleton House exemplifies a rarefied lifestyle: that of an eighteenth-century gentleman “with taste and wealth,” according to the museum’s 1904 catalogue. But, from the perspective of the present, Pendleton House also speaks to an incessant flow of commodities, ideas, and bodies—and the extraordinary labor of nevertheless constructing a national identity that appears to be constant and indigenous.

With Publication Intensive participants, editors will speak about how identities are cultivated through the circulation of goods, the branding of native expressions, and the repurposing of foreign styles. We’ll ask how creative acts might effectively displace historical figures and styles, superimpose the present on the past. We’ll consider how various approaches to publication might forge new (and resurrect old) narratives around artworks and homewares—and, in so doing, work against the kind of rhetoric in which artificial images of bygone days form an idealized vision of the future.

For all related inquiries, write to edu@canopycanopycanopy.com.