Triple Canopy is pleased to present The Invisible Grammar: A Tribute to Aspen's "Time, Silence and Reduction, and Language" Issue on its Forty-Second Anniversary, as part of Printed Matter's annual NY Art Book Fair. Ten issues of Aspen were published between 1965 and 1971. The famed "multimedia magazine in a box" generally contained vinyl recordings, writing, artworks, film, and other objects. Today, Triple Canopy editors, contributors, and friends will read, perform, play, and otherwise interpret works from issues five and six, which were edited by Brian O'Doherty and published together in the fall of 1967. These endeavors will take place throughout PS1 as well as in The Classroom, where the fair's programs will be held, and where select editions derived from the interpretations listed below will be available.

Tom Roberge: The Death of the Author, by Roland Barthes • Catherine Czacki: "Text for Nothing #8," by Samuel Beckett • Adam Helms: Seven Translucent Tiers, by Mel Bochner • Nicole Russo: "Nova Express," by William Burroughs • Molly Kleiman: "Conditionnement," by Michel Butor • Dan Torop & Alexander Provan: "Fontana Mix-Feed," by John Cage • Georgia Sagri: "Space, Time and Dance," by Merce Cunningham • Nolan Simon & Oliver Newton: "The Creative Act," by Marcel Duchamp • Summer Guthery: "A L'infinitif" by Marcel Duchamp • Nathan Gwynne: "The King of Denmark," by Morton Feldman • Peter Simensky: "The Realistic Manifesto," by Naum Gabo • Caolan Madden: "Poem, March 1966," by Dan Graham • Julia Weist: "Jealousy," by Alain Robbe-Grillet • Forté Magazine: "Phantastische Gebete," by Richard Huelsenbeck • Nadja Millner-Larsen: "Style and The Representation of Historical Time," by George Kubler • Kate Shepherd: "Serial Project #1," by Sol Lewitt • Andrea Merkx: "The Russian Desert: A Note on Our State of Knowledge," by Douglas MacAgy • Natalie Campbell & Bridget Lewis: "Lightplay: Black-White-Grey," by Laszlo Moholy-Nagy • Zack Rockhill: "Site," by Robert Morris & Stan VanDerBeek • Hannah Whitaker & Sam Frank: "Structural Play #3," by Brian O'Doherty • Andres Laracuente: "Linoleum," by Robert Rauschenberg • Jessie Stead: "Rhythm 21," by Hans Richter • Rachel Owens: "The Maze," by Tony Smith • Alexander Provan: "The Aesthetics of Silence," by Susan Sontag
Participants
  • Tom Roberge is a book editor and freelance writer.
  • Catherine Czacki
  • Adam Helms is a New York–based artist and a former Triple Canopy contributing editor. He is obsessive, a collector of ephemera, and a friend to all animals.
  • Nicole Russo
  • Molly Kleiman is Triple Canopy’s editorial director, co-director of the Back Room, and part-time faculty at New York University’s Gallatin School.
  • Dan Torop lives and works in New York City. He works with lenses, film, paper, words, vehicles, and computer languages. In 2013 Torop showed Alkali Desert, an exhibition that retraced Mark Twain’s 1861 journey across Utah’s alkali desert, at the Green Gallery in Milwaukee. Alkali Desert was also on display at the Center for Land Use Interpretation’s Wendover Exhibit Hall One in 2012.
  • Alexander Provan is the editor of Triple Canopy and a contributing editor of Bidoun. He is the recipient of a 2015 Creative Capital | Andy Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Grant and was a 2013–15 fellow at the Vera List Center for Art and Politics.
  • Georgia Sagri
  • Nolan Simon
  • Oliver Newton
  • Summer Guthery
  • Nathan Gwynne
  • Peter Simensky
  • Caolan Madden has an MFA in poetry from Johns Hopkins and is a PhD candidate in English at Rutgers University. She lives in Brooklyn.
  • Julia Weist is an artist and author living in Brooklyn. She was educated at the Cooper Union School of Art and is completing a master’s of library science at Pratt Institute. Sexy Librarian is her first novel.
  • Nadja Millner-Larsen is a writer living in New York. She is currently completing her PhD in the Department of Media, Culture and Communication at New York University. She has recently taught at NYU and at Bard College’s Center for Curatorial Studies.
  • Kate Shepherd is a born and bred New Yorker. In addition to the fine-lined enamel paintings for which she is best known, she makes prints, wood puzzles, sculptures, drawings, and site-specific land art. She is represented by Galerie Lelong (New York, Paris), Anthony Meier Fine Art (San Francisco), and Barbara Krakow Gallery (Boston) and has also exhibited with Galería Elvira González (Madrid) and Bartha Contemporary (London). Her work has been acquired by museums such as the Phillips Collection, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and the Indianapolis Museum of Art.
  • Andrea Merkx received her MFA from Hunter College, City University of New York. She has exhibited and performed at venues such as the Or Gallery, BC, Circuit, CH; the Swiss Institute-Contemporary Art, NY; Bureau, NY; Tidens Krav, NO; along with the Bowery Ballroom, Terminal 5, and Irving Plaza, NY. Since 2012 she has been working as part of Merkx&Gwynne, a collaborative framework for interdisciplinary experimentation in group-exhibition-cum-music-video-set production and opera.
  • Natalie Campbell
  • Bridget Lewis
  • Zach Rockhill is an artist and architect living and working in Brooklyn.
  • Hannah Whitaker is a photographer and Triple Canopy contributing editor based in New York City.
  • Sam Frank is a contributing editor of Triple Canopy.
  • Andres Laracuente is a New York–based artist working primarily with moving image, performance, sculpture, and photography.
  • Jessie Stead
  • Rachel Owens lives and works in Brooklyn and is represented by ZieherSmith gallery. She received her MFA from the Art Institute of Chicago in 1999 and was awarded a fellowship by Socrates Sculpture Park in 2007. She has previously exhibited at Bellwether Gallery, Jack the Pelican Presents, Lehmann Maupin Gallery, and apexart.
  • Alexander Provan is the editor of Triple Canopy and a contributing editor of Bidoun. He is the recipient of a 2015 Creative Capital | Andy Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Grant and was a 2013–15 fellow at the Vera List Center for Art and Politics.